Conversations in patriarchal societies tend to amplify men’s voices more than women’s, and Twitter is no exception to this rule. A study last year found male US political reporters retweet other men three times more than they do their female colleagues, while Harvard Business School researchers in 2009 found men in general were almost twice as likely to follow another man as a woman. Many Twitter users may not be intentionally ignoring women’s input, but these small biases add up. And there’s now a tool that shows whether you retweet and respond to men more than women on Twitter. The website, built by open-data researcher Bastian Greshake Tzovaras, allows people to upload their Twitter archives and then analyzes the results. It can be a little buggy (several Quartz reporters never got an email saying their results were ready, and instead just found their graphs on the homepage of the website), but it works. On Twitter, Tzovaras said more than 300 people have uploaded their Twitter archives, and has also noticed that his own interactions have improved since he started paying attention to his gender balance. I was worried my own data would show a bias. Though I consider myself a s...