Usually binding is dictated by the type and kind of baler that you own or use. However, many balers have capabilities for both twine and net wrap, and the decision of which one to use or switch between either can be based on forage type, location, time, or even storage plans (indoors or outdoors). With advancements in technology, forage binding methods have grown to include a variety of options, including twine, net wrap, and plastic wrapping. Twine has traditionally been the type of binding most commonly used and can be made from plastic, sisal, and polypropylene. If you have been using plastic twine, it’s likely that you’re still finding it in cattle lots — stuck in the dirt — where round bales have been fed for years. Sisal twine became popular due to the degradability of its fiber. Yet, depending on the year, sisal twine could begin degrading before bales are moved from the field, leaving behind a trail of wasted hay as they are transported. Newer twine products such as solar-degradable twine combine the advantages of both sisal and synthetics with a longer storage life before decomposition occurs. Regardless of the type of twine selected, it takes 20 to 30 turns to wrap a ...