While our smartphones are many things, one of their primary functions is to make calls. Many of us try to avoid ever having to make calls, but there are situations when it’s a must, such as wishing your grandma happy Birthday or calling 911 — and in those times you want stellar call quality. For the most part, the call quality of phones is dependent upon your carrier. As with any audio, there are codecs or audio formats used to deliver sound from your phone to whomever you calling and vice versa, with each having varying impact on the call quality. For GSM users such as AT&T and T-Mobile, this means using adaptive multi-rate codecs. For Verizon and Sprint subscribers, you are using enhanced variable rate codecs. Your phone’s involvement in this process starts at its support for these codecs. Features such as enhanced voice services and HD Voice give more bandwidth to calls, improving call quality. These must be supported by both the carrier and the phone to work. However, the phone call experience is more than just call quality. With the rise of robocalls and spam calling, having a phone which can prevent you from picking these up goes a long way. Additionally, b...